Music and mental health are–not completely surprisingly–linked, according to a recent article by NPR. If you include better academic performance, communication skills, and language development in the realm of mental health, you’ll agree. I know what you’re thinking, “Music isn’t for mental health, it’s for recreation,” but think about it for a moment. Music has the power to calm us down, rev us up, make us sad, and more–isn’t that related to mental health?

Music and mental health, academic performance related

In a study, it was found that children who went through two years of music lessons weren’t just learning how to play an instrument–they were improving their brain’s ability to understand language. Unfortunately, it’s not listening to music that creates this benefit, it’s actually creating the music.

This link between music and mental health is great news for struggling students that have issues reading. Struggling students often feel isolated because of their learning difficulties, leading to issues like depression and anxiety–but this gives a possible, if not solution, boost! Making music can help improve a student’s reading skills, leading to an increase in understanding material, which naturally leads to better academic performance. For the parent of a struggling student, maybe it’s time to ask if they’d be interested in playing an instrument–don’t force one, just ask. This could become a hobby that not just gives them something productive to do, but actually improves their overall wellness!
This also strengthens the argument to keep the arts within schools. Art class, music class, theater class–they all have something to offer in the way of helping kids express themselves, work through stress, and improve their mental health.

Asheville Academy for Girls can help

Asheville Academy for Girls is a therapeutic boarding school for young girls, ages 10-14, struggling with anxiety, depression, ADHD, and other behavioral or mental issues.

For more information about how Asheville Academy for Girls can help your daughter, call 800-264-8709 today!