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Programs For Troubled Teens and Families From Wisconsin

Wisconsin Girls Find Help Through Programs for Troubled Teens

While no one looks back on early puberty fondly, in some cases, the sudden intense physical and emotional changes that occur during this period can pull families apart, ruin relationships, and cause severe distress for all involved. In most situations, a girl’s puberty will fall somewhere in the middle.

Programs for troubled teens, like Asheville Academy offer young girls from Wisconsin and their families the support they may need to make it through this difficult period. Specifically targeted at ages 10-14, Asheville Academy guides troubled Wisconsin girls on their journey through adolescence into young adulthood. We believe that our students are struggling with deeper emotional issues that can be resolved rather than labeling them as “troubled.”

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The foundation of Asheville Academy’s program is rebuilding family relationships. A lot of Wisconsin families have reached a breaking point when they reach out to Asheville Academy and worry that re-establishing their relationship with their daughter is hopeless. Once families leave Asheville Academy, they’ve re-established a healthy relationship with their daughter and learned how to stay connected through the next phase of her journey.

Our therapeutic boarding school can help your family from Wisconsin build confidence and find success. Call 800-264-8709 to learn more about how we can help your family today!

We Can Help Your Daughter Heal

Our therapists provide personalized treatment plans for each child

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Asheville Academy Provides Help to Wisconsin Families

Asheville Academy is a unique, innovative program for troubled teens. Unlike so many other programs for troubled teens, Asheville Academy provides a therapeutic boarding school experience to ensure that a girl can take all the time she needs to heal, without losing a beat academically. Girls from Wisconsin have the opportunity to receive a proper education throughout their therapeutic journey.

Young girls learn more than just class curriculum in a school environment. Unfortunately, many factors, like bullying, academic troubles, and low self-esteem can turn a school experience from positive to negative. Many of these negative experiences that Wisconsin girls face fly under the radar in traditional school environments.

At Asheville Academy, small classes and a kind, professional staff guarantee that no girl goes without the attention she deserves. Our philosophy is based on the idea that your daughter isn’t troubled, but that she needs more support in developing the skills she needs to succeed. Our unique approach helps young girls feel better prepared for a happier and healthier future. For more information about how Asheville Academy helps families from Wisconsin, call 800.264.8709. We can help your family today!

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