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Programs for Troubled Teens From Minnesota

Programs for Troubled Teen Guide Minnesota Girls Towards Success

Growing up is hard. For many Minnesota families, their daughter’s transition into a teenager can best be described as “walking on eggshells”. In the blink of an eye, a girl can shift from being a happy child into someone that may be impossible to recognize. Unfortunately, simply waiting the period out does not always work: since these early years are significant in defining a girl’s adult personality, a parent’s help is vital in ensuring a healthy future. Programs for troubled teens can help families support their daughter through this difficult period.

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Asheville Academy for Girls, a program for troubled teens, helps Minnesota families guide their troubled daughter back on her way to success. While the word troubled suggests hopelessness, we help girls learn the skills they need to make lasting changes. Asheville Academy for Girls is a therapeutic boarding school that was created to help girls ages 10-14 through the most difficult years of their lives.

At Asheville Academy for Girls, the family always comes first. Although it may seem like there is no hope of rebuilding relationships, the programs for troubled teens at Asheville Academy for Girls can reconnect parents and children and build the foundation for years of communication and support. Minnesota parents work closely with our experienced professionals to help their daughter overcome challenges she faces during puberty.

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Our therapists provide personalized treatment plans for each child

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Asheville Academy for Girls’ Program Helps Troubled Teens from Minnesota 

As a therapeutic boarding school, Asheville Academy for Girls is a unique program for troubled teens. For many girls from Minnesota, school plays a big role in the difficulties they have for a variety of reasons, including learning differences, bullying, or low self-esteem. The negative experiences they have at school may be compounded if they lead to a decline in their academic performance. Whereas in traditional school settings, teachers are often overworked and underprepared, Asheville Academy for Girls has the resources to provide individualized attention to every student.

Asheville Academy for Girls’ accredited academic program is consistent with local curriculum to guarantee that students are earning credit and keeping up with their peers. Unlike many other programs for troubled teens, Asheville Academy for Girls ensures that a child is never far removed from “real life” during their therapeutic journey. Instead of assuming that these young girls are troubled, we dig deeper into underlying issues that have contributed to their unhealthy coping mechanisms and help them challenge negative beliefs about themselves.

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