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Programs for Troubled Teens From Arizona

Programs for Troubled Teen Guide Arizona Girls Towards Success

Many Arizona girls have had a hard time transitioning into adolescence and their families feel like they have to walk on eggshells around them. This transition from a happy child into a moody teen can happen in the blink of an eye. Unfortunately, simply waiting the period out does not always work: since these early years are significant in defining a girl’s adult personality, a parent’s help is vital in ensuring a healthy future. Programs for troubled teens can help families support their daughter through this difficult period.

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Asheville Academy is a nationally-recognized program for troubled teens that takes a more compassionate approach to helping Arizona get their daughter back. We don’t believe your daughter is troubled, but we understand how the challenges she’s faced have been difficult without having developed the skills she needs to overcome them. Asheville Academy is a therapeutic boarding school that was created to help girls ages 10-14 through the most difficult years of their lives.

Strengthening our students’ relationships with their families is our main priority at Asheville Academy. Although it may seem like there is no hope of rebuilding relationships, the programs for troubled teens at Asheville Academy can reconnect parents and children and build the foundation for years of communication and support. With the help of our experienced professionals, Arizona families learn the best ways to support their daughter as she goes through the obstacles of adolescence.

We Can Help Your Daughter Heal

Our therapists provide personalized treatment plans for each child

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Asheville Academy’ Program Helps Troubled Teens from Arizona 

There are many reasons Asheville Academy is unique among programs for troubled teens. For one, Asheville Academy offers a therapeutic boarding school. For many girls from Arizona, school plays a big role in the difficulties they have for a variety of reasons, including learning differences, bullying, or low self-esteem. The negative experiences they have at school may be compounded if they lead to a decline in their academic performance. Asheville Academy offers every student the individualized attention they need that they often don’t receive in traditional school settings where teachers do not have enough time or resources to dedicate to every individual.

With an accredited academic program, Asheville Academy guarantees that students are learning material that is consistent with the local curriculum. Unlike many other programs for troubled teens, Asheville Academy ensures that a child is never far removed from “real life” during their therapeutic journey. We reject the idea of young girls being troubled and follow an approach that looks at underlying issues contributing to their unhealthy coping mechanisms.

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