Call Us More Info

Programs for Troubled Teens From Alaska

Programs for Troubled Teen Guide Alaska Girls Towards Success

Many Alaska families feel like they have to walk on eggshells around their daughter, as she struggles with the transition into adolescence. In the blink of an eye, a girl can shift from being a happy child into someone that may be impossible to recognize. Unfortunately, simply waiting the period out does not always work: since these early years are significant in defining a girl’s adult personality, a parent’s help is vital in ensuring a healthy future. Programs for troubled teens can help young girls who feel lost during this overwhelming period of their lives.

programs for troubled teens {State}
Contact Us






Please Answer =

Asheville Academy is a nationally-recognized program for troubled teens that takes a more compassionate approach to helping Alaska get their daughter back. We don’t necessarily like the word troubled as we have had years of experience watching girls overcome the troubles they’ve faced. Asheville Academy is specifically designed to assist girls 10-14 through the most difficult years of their lives.

Strengthening our students’ relationships with their families is our main priority at Asheville Academy. Even when families believe that rebuilding their relationship is hopeless, Asheville Academy’ program for troubled teens reconnects parents and children and gives them a foundation for years of communication and support. Alaska parents work closely with our experienced professionals to help their daughter overcome challenges she faces during puberty.

We Can Help Your Daughter Heal

Our therapists provide personalized treatment plans for each child

Contact Us

Asheville Academy’ Program Helps Troubled Teens from Alaska 

There are many reasons Asheville Academy is unique among programs for troubled teens. For one, Asheville Academy offers a therapeutic boarding school. Many Alaska girls have a hard time in traditional school settings, with problems ranging from academic struggles to bullying and social rejection. The negative experiences they have at school may be compounded if they lead to a decline in their academic performance. Moreover, teachers can find themselves overworked and underprepared to provide individualized attention to every student. The opposite is true at Asheville Academy.

With an accredited academic program, Asheville Academy guarantees that students are learning material that is consistent with the local curriculum. Unlike many other programs for troubled teens, Asheville Academy ensures that a child is never far removed from “real life” during their therapeutic journey. We reject the idea of young girls being troubled and follow an approach that looks at underlying issues contributing to their unhealthy coping mechanisms.

Recent Blogs

  • Unhealthy Attachments: Attachment Disorder Symptoms in Children
    Social connection is an essential part of human nature.  We form bonds and connections with others through socialization.  Along with these social bonds comes emotional attachment, we naturally become emotionally attached to our close friends and loved ones.  However, in some circumstances, people have trouble forming healthy attachments to others,... Read more »
  • Helping Your Daughter with ADHD Struggling In An Academic Setting
    ADHD symptoms can make focusing in school extremely difficult for your daughter. As a parent, you want your daughter to have academic success and perform to her fullest potential. While medication does play an important role in reducing ADHD symptoms, research reveals many non-medication methods that are beneficial to combating... Read more »
  • Under Pressure: Helping your daughter cope with teen stress
    Can you imagine being a teen today? Probably not. Beginning in elementary school, young people are expected to follow a specific track- one that leads to higher education, success, and a good job. Because of this, teen stress can seem almost unbearable. Guiding your teen through this stress is important... Read more »
Back to top of page